Florida – Growth of Blackjack Addiction Reported – casino blog

blackjack-pic2Its no casino news that when people think about gambling addiction, they frequently think about online slots games or poker, but they don’t tend to give a second thought about blackjack. As a casino blog, we feel obliged to share about the intricacies of the scene. However, a growing number of people who have been calling for special help have had their lives ruined by this card game. Just a year ago, poker was the main vice of those addicted to card games. After more than seven months, blackjack is nearly equal to the poker calls for help made by gambling addicts.

Economy Downturn

And when average Floridians are affected by the economic downturn, they turn to play. According to Pat Fowler, head of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of the state, sometimes what they find is a disaster. We should clarify as a casino blog that non responsible gambling is a common practice throughout the world. Some who call for help, he adds,  “they thought they could earn enough money to pay their mortgage or rent; thought of the possibility of solving their problems. Of course that does not make sense. Everyone should know that [in the card games] one is more likely to lose than to win.”

Blackjack Takes the Spotlight

In January, 43 percent of the card players seeking help for addiction cited blackjack. A year earlier, only nine percent identified themselves as blackjack players. The rest mentioned poker as the cause of your problem. As of 2013, general, calls to the state line help are constantly increasing. And more than half of the total calls for help originate in South Florida, the hub of the state’s casino industry. The figures show that slot machines are the most reported, although card games are gaining ground. The percentage of people who called blaming the card games of their problems increased from 21 percent in the first six months to 34 percent in the next period. Those who identified themselves as slot machine players fell from 50 to 44 percent.

Other statistics, some disturbing, remained more or less the same. Just over 60 percent of the callers were men, and the average debt reported between $ 54,000 and $ 60,000. About a third of the callers said they had committed some sort of crime such as fraud, embezzlement or theft.